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Reblogged from chalkandwater

chalkandwater:

The Fountain (2006)

Reblogged from process-vision
Reblogged from antinwo
The day science begins to study non-physical phenomena, it will make more progress in one decade than in all the previous centuries of its existence. To understand the true nature of the universe, one must think it terms of energy, frequency and vibration. Nikola Tesla (via antinwo)
Reblogged from carlsagan

(Source: carlsagan, via megacosms)

Reblogged from atraversso
Reblogged from magicklantern
magicklantern:

They told me I wouldn’t
But I found an answer
Let me not be too consumedWith this worldSometimes I want to go homeAnd stay out of sight
for a long time. 

magicklantern:

They told me I wouldn’t

But I found an answer

Let me not be too consumed
With this world
Sometimes I want to go home
And stay out of sight

for a long time. 

Reblogged from poochin
Reblogged from scienceisbeauty
scienceisbeauty:

First photograph ever taken by phosphorescent light. The face is that of Mr. Tesla, and the source of light is one of his phosphorescent bulbs. The time of exposure, eight minutes. Date of photograph January, 1894.
Source (Tesla Universe)

scienceisbeauty:

First photograph ever taken by phosphorescent light. The face is that of Mr. Tesla, and the source of light is one of his phosphorescent bulbs. The time of exposure, eight minutes. Date of photograph January, 1894.

Source (Tesla Universe)

(via megacosms)

Reblogged from tulipnight
tulipnight:

Fishing boat/iceberg reflections by greenland_com on Flickr.
Photo by Uri Golman.

tulipnight:

Fishing boat/iceberg reflections by greenland_com on Flickr.

Photo by Uri Golman.

(via aexerghmc)

Reblogged from spaceplasma

Photo by Maynard Pittendreigh
Comet Ikeya–Seki, formally designated C/1965 S1, 1965 VIII, and 1965f, was a long-period comet discovered independently by Kaoru Ikeya and Tsutomu Seki. First observed as a faint telescopic object on September 18, 1965, the first calculations of its orbit suggested that on October 21, it would pass just 450,000 km above the Sun’s surface, and would probably become extremely bright.
Comets can defy all predictions, but Ikeya–Seki performed as expected. As it approached perihelion observers reported that it was clearly visible in the daytime sky next to the Sun. In Japan, where it reached perihelion at local noon, it was seen shining at magnitude −10. It proved to be one of the brightest comets seen in the last thousand years, and is sometimes known as the Great Comet of 1965.
The comet was seen to break into three pieces just before its perihelion passage. The three pieces continued in almost identical orbits, and the comet re-appeared in the morning sky in late October, showing a very bright tail. By early 1966, it had faded from view as it receded into the outer solar system.
Ikeya–Seki is a member of the Kreutz Sungrazers, which are suggested to be fragments of a large comet which broke up in 1106

Photo by Maynard Pittendreigh

Comet Ikeya–Seki, formally designated C/1965 S1, 1965 VIII, and 1965f, was a long-period comet discovered independently by Kaoru Ikeya and Tsutomu Seki. First observed as a faint telescopic object on September 18, 1965, the first calculations of its orbit suggested that on October 21, it would pass just 450,000 km above the Sun’s surface, and would probably become extremely bright.

Comets can defy all predictions, but Ikeya–Seki performed as expected. As it approached perihelion observers reported that it was clearly visible in the daytime sky next to the Sun. In Japan, where it reached perihelion at local noon, it was seen shining at magnitude −10. It proved to be one of the brightest comets seen in the last thousand years, and is sometimes known as the Great Comet of 1965.

The comet was seen to break into three pieces just before its perihelion passage. The three pieces continued in almost identical orbits, and the comet re-appeared in the morning sky in late October, showing a very bright tail. By early 1966, it had faded from view as it receded into the outer solar system.

Ikeya–Seki is a member of the Kreutz Sungrazers, which are suggested to be fragments of a large comet which broke up in 1106

(via megacosms)

Reblogged from plasmatics-life
plasmatics:

Madeira - Portugal  Source: Cristiano Ronaldo | (Website)

plasmatics:

Madeira - Portugal  Source: Cristiano Ronaldo | (Website)

(via aexerghmc)

Reblogged from jekemp
jekemp:

Bicycle RV

jekemp:

Bicycle RV

Reblogged from hollywoodmarcia

hollywoodmarcia:

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

(via megacosms)